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HUD and Fha

HUD; the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and FHA; the Federal Housing Administration were founded as two separate entities but now share much more than originally planned. HUD oversees and guarantees both residential and multifamily lending and insurance programs. The FHA, which in 1965 became a part of HUD deals primarily in residential lending; aiding in the purchase of primary residences for Americans. FHA is, although now a "subsidiary of HUD" responsible for the overall management and administration of HUD's Multifamily Housing Programs and HUD ultimately provides the insurance. 

HUD Insured Loans

A common misconception is that HUD makes loans to developers and real estate investors for the recapitalization, acquisition, rehabilitation and construction of multifamily properties, but the reality is that HUD actually insures these loans and the loans are made by investors. 

Refinancing, building, Rehabilitating or Acquiring Multifamily Properties

The FHA or HUD 223(f) program was created for the refinance or acquisition of multifamily properties. It is another misconception that HUD focuses on Section 8 properties, subsidized housing or low income housing, but the reality is that the HUD 223(f) program insures loans for the full spectrum of market rate multifamily properties across the nation, with further considerations for low income housing, rental assistance, LIHTC, and so-on. The HUD and FHA insurance programs were created to ensure the ongoing availability of capital for the acquisition, rehabilitation, development and refinancing of all apartment properties and absolutely not excluding market rate apartments. 

HUD For Multifamily Developers

The FHA or HUD 221(d)(4) program insures multifamily developers building market rate, low income, rental assistance and other multifamily developments. Loans generally range from $2,000,000 to $100,000,000 or more. There is no hard cap or bottom for the loan amounts but because of the costs involved with originating a HUD Insured multifamily development loan, oftentimes developers of smaller multifamily projects are intimidated by the pricing, as well as the process. The HUD 221(d)(4) process has been improved and streamlined over the years but can still take 8-12 months to close. 

Amortizations and Maturities

FHA insured financing provides for the longest terms in the industry, but something that further sets these loans apart is that all loans are fully amortizing, thereby also creating the longest amortizations in the industry and the most flexibility on debt service coverage ratios as longer amortizations mean lower payments. FHA insured construction loans are fixed for 40 years plus up to an additional 3 years during the construction period. HUD 221(d)(4) provides one of the very few, if not only, fixed rate construction loans in the multifamily development business. Existing assets for purchase or refinance similarly are qualified to achieve very long term fully amortizing loans. In the case of HUD 223(f) insured loans; these loans are fully amortizing for up to 35 years; provided the term and amortization does not exceed 75% of the property's remaining economic life. As industry professionals know, the longer the fixed rate, the higher the interest rate (except for in the case of an inverse yield curve), however in the case of FHA and HUD insured loans, because they are government insured and earn a AAA credit rating, rates are lower than Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac 10 year fixed rate loans

Timing and "Red Tape"

For all the benefits of HUD insured loans: rates, leverage, term, amortization and so-on; there are undoubtedly additional hurdles to overcome, although in the case of 221(d)(4) and 223(f), the process is no longer as long and difficult as it may have been in the past -- provided you are represented by an experienced intermediary. HUD insured loans require annual financial audits which may cost upwards of $2,500 per year, they take longer to close (223f loans may take 120 days, and 221d4 loans may take 10 months), and there are more upfront costs and closing costs associated with the origination of HUD insured loans. That said, a 223f insured loan isn't vastly different from originating a Fannie or Freddie multifamily loan. Other requirements involve things like: Phase 1 environmental reports are required to include led based paint and asbestos reviews for properties build before 1978, HUD doesn't insure loans for new properties located within a 100 year flood plain and construction and substantial rehabilitation loans required adherence to David Bacon labor standards. The Davis Bacon Wage determination can be found online at www.wdol.gov/dba.aspx. By entering the state, county and construction type, in this case residential, the tool will populate the most recent wage requirements. Additional requirements are spelled out in the "Loan Programs" section of our website relative to each product. 

Conclusion

HUD insured loans may not be for everyone, and certainly are not for small balance loans (as fixed origination costs translate to higher costs when interpreted as a percentage of the loan amount). Time sensitive loans are also no likely to be the best fit for an FHA insured loan. Navigate our website and www.Multifamily.loans to understand all the multifamily financing options available and choose carefully. With the guidance of an experienced intermediary financing the acquisition, development, rehabilitation or recapitalization of apartment properties should be a reasonably seamless process. 


Fill out the form below, or call (877) 585-8645 for a free consultation.

 
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HUD 221(d)(4) 
The ground-up development loan of your dreams

The FHA 221(d)(4) loan guaranteed by HUD is the multifamily industry’s highest-leverage, lowest-cost, non-recourse, fixed-rate loan available in the business. 221(d)(4) loans are fixed and fully amortizing for 40 years, which doesn’t include the up-to-three-years, interest-only fixed rate during the construction period. (So, the loan is fixed for up to 43 years and fully amortizing for 40.) 

HUD loans, unlike most bank loans, are completely asset-based, meaning that HUD scrutinizes the property location, the pro forma rents and expenses, and of course the development team to ensure it successfully comes out of the ground. HUD 221(d)(4) loans are more costly to originate and take longer to close than traditional loans; but, if you're working with an experienced intermediary, the costs of and time to originate an FHA 221(d)(4)-insured loan are far outweighed by the benefits in the form of leverage, interest-rate risk mitigation, recourse, and more.

Overview of Terms, Qualifications, and Valuable Facts

Facts to Consider

HUD provides a full checklist of requirements, but much of the checklist and process is managed in house. You can see the full HUD 221(d)(4) checklist here. We've also provided a fairly complete synopsis of the FHA 221(d)(4)-insured loan program below. You can find the basics to submit a file for consideration on the Apply Page of our site. 

  • 40-year fixed and fully amortizing interest rates as of November 2017 are ranging between 4.10% and 4.75%, which include MIP. 221(d)(4) loans are interest-only during the construction period, which provides for up to an additional three years of financing at the same fixed rate.
  • All loans must go through a HUD pre-review process.
  • Adherence to Davis-Bacon prevailing wage standards is required.
  • An annual audit of operations is required.
  • Hard second liens are not allowed, but soft seconds and stock pledges are allowed if structured in accordance with HUD requirements.
  • A bonded general contractor is required.
  • The minimum loan amount is $2 million; exceptions are made on a case-by-case basis. Generally, most 221(d)(4) construction loans are $15 million and above. There is no maximum loan amount. 

Eligible Properties   

The construction or substantial rehabilitation of detached, semi-detached, row, walkup, and elevator-type multifamily properties, including market rate, low-to-moderate income; and subsidized multifamily, cooperative housing and affordable housing properties with at least five units. 

commercial space limitation 

Commercial and retail space is limited to the lesser of 10% of the gross floor area or 15% of gross income. 

ELIGIBLE Borrowers 

Single-asset, bankruptcy-remote, for-profit or nonprofit entities.

Use of Proceeds (substantial rehabilitation only) 

To qualify as a substantial rehabilitation of a multifamily property, a property must meet one of the following requirements: 

(a) the cost of repairs, replacements, and improvements to the existing property must exceed the greater of 15% of the replacement cost of the property after completion of all work or $6,500 per unit adjusted by the local HUD office for high cost percentage in that area; or
(b) the replacement of two or more buildings, regardless of the cost.

loan amount/Leverage/Dscr

The loan amount will be maximum proceeds subject to the lesser of:

  • 83.3% LTC (or replacement cost), 83.3% of net operating income, or 1.20 DSCR for market rate properties
  • 87% LTC (or replacement cost), 87% of net operating income, or 1.15 DSCR for affordable housing properties
  • 90% LTC (or replacement cost), 90% of net operating income, or 1.11 DSCR for rental assistance properties 

Escrows

  • Replacement reserves are required in accordance with HUD guidelines.
  • Taxes and insurance escrowed monthly (post-construction).
  • Working capital reserve account equal to 4% of the loan amount (paid in cash or letter of credit (LOC)), with unused amount refunded, as per "additional items" below.
  • Operating deficit reserve equal to at least 3% of the loan amount; unused amount later refunded as per "additional items" below.

Mortgage Insurance Premium 

A mortgage insurance premium is paid annually (in the above example of a rate between 4.10% and 4.75%, those interest rates already include the estimated HUD-required MIP). The MIP is payable at closing for each year of construction and then annually thereafter. The mortgage insurance premium is 65 basis points for market rate properties, 45 basis points for Section 8 or new money LIHTC properties, and 70 basis points for Section 220 urban renewal projects that are not Section 8 or LIHTC.

Term & Amortization

Fixed and interest only for up to 36 months during construction, followed by an additional 40 years of fully amortizing, fixed-rate payments. A maximum term of 43 years, including construction period.

Interest Rate

Interest rates are fixed throughout the life of the loan (both construction and permanent stages) and determined at commitment by prevailing market conditions. As of November 2017, interest rates on HUD 221(d)(4) loans are generally ranging from 3.10% to 4.10% before accounting for the required MIP adjustment. 30- to 180-day rate lock commitments are available. An early rate lock feature is available, allowing the borrower to lock the rate after preliminary underwriting. There is a 1% rate lock deposit payable at the time of rate lock, to be refunded at closing. 

Recourse

All loans are non-recourse to key principals during both construction and permanent financing, subject to standard carve-outs.

Assumability

All loans are fully assumable subject to FHA approval and a fee of 0.05% of the original FHA-insured loan amount. 

Prepayment

Generally, for best pricing, 10 years of call protection with a two-year lockout, followed by a step down from 8%. There is no prepayment penalty if the loan is assumed. 

Replacement Reserves

Annual deposits are required for replacement reserves equal to the greater of (a) 0.60% of the total cost for new construction or 0.40% of the loan amount for substantial rehabilitation projects; or (b) $250 per unit per year. In certain circumstances, HUD may consider waivers if calculations exceed $500 per door. 

Application

Market rate property applications follow a two-step process: first the pre-application, then the firm application. Affordable and rental assistance properties may use MAP one-stage processing.

synopsis of costs

  • Application fee: usually $25,000 to cover lender due diligence and third-party reports, including:
    • Appraisal
    • Phase 1 environmental
    • Construction cost review
    • Market study
    • Plans and specs review
  • FHA exam fee: 0.30% payed as 0.15% at pre-application and 0.15% at application
  • FHA inspection fee: 0.50% payed from mortgage proceeds
  • Financing and placement fees: typically capped at 3.50% of the loan amount paid at closing from mortgage proceeds
  • Good-faith deposit (rate lock and commitment): between 0.50% and 1% of loan amount paid at the time of commitment and refunded at closing 
  • Lender's legal, title, and other standard borrower closing costs

Timing

One-stage applications for affordable and rental assistance properties generally take five to seven months to close, whereas two-stage applications for market rate properties generally close in eight to 12 months, subject to deal specifics. 


Additional HUD Requirements and Items for consideration

  • An initial operating deficit account may be required to cover operating shortfalls incurred prior to stabilization. Usually, the amount will be equal to the greater of an appraiser's or underwriter's estimate, or four months of debt service for garden apartments, or six months of debt service for elevator buildings.
  • A working capital deposit in the form of cash or a letter of credit is required by HUD on all new construction projects in the amount of 4% of the loan amount. For substantial rehabilitation, the deposit would be equal to 2% of the loan amount. 
  • Unused working capital and initial operating deficit escrows are released at the later of 12 months from the final endorsement or six months of break-even occupancy.
  • Stabilization must be projected as achievable within 18 months of the certificate of occupancy. 
  • The borrower must retain a qualified arms-length supervisory architect during the construction.
  • A cost certification for the general contractor and owner are required upon construction completion.
  • The general contract must execute a GMP contract, provide a 100% performance and payment bond (cash escrow or letter of credit acceptable), and have a liquidity position equal to at least 5% of the project construction contract plus all uncompleted construction work.
  • Loans over $40 million may be subject to more conservative leverage and DSRC requirements.
  • Maximum underwritten occupancy of 93% for market rate properties and 95% for 90% rental assistance properties.
  • Qualifies for Ginnie Mae-guaranteed, mortgage-backed securities, direct placement, or may be used to credit enhance tax-exempt bonds.

Get Qualified!

To apply for a 221(d)(4) loan, please go to our Apply Page and follow the instructions, or send an email with your contact information and info about your project to hello@multifamily.loans today. 

If a HUD 221(d)(4) loan isn't right for your multifamily development or substantial rehabilitation project, please visit www.multifamily.loans for more options that include bank financing, life company financing, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and more. You may also email Multifamily.Loans directly at hello@multifamily.loans

Call Now: (877) 585-8645

Speak with a HUD-Insured Multifamily & Health Care Finance Specialist

HUD 223(f)
The only way to refinance or purchase apartment buildings

HUD's FHA 223(f) multifamily loan insurance program has become more popular in the past years, most recently spurred by the 2008 Credit Crunch. Even with all the popularity it gained, it's still grossly misunderstood and even unknown, but it offers financing that is always longer term and longer amortization, and at a lower interest rate than Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, CMBS loans, and even life company multifamily loans

In the past, FHA 223(f) loans garnered a reputation as being solely for nonprofits, low-income housing, and affordable housing projects; because of this, many market-rate multifamily owners/operators have, and continue to, miss out on the industry's most affordable (and highest-leverage) financing mechanism. HUD 223(f)-insured loans carry the stigma, and rightfully so, of taking longer to originate. That's true, as average origination times remain around four months from application to closing; but if you're not in a great hurry, that's only 60 days longer than the average amount of time it takes to close a Freddie Mac multifamily loan or even a Fannie Mae D.U.S. multifamily mortgage.

Call (877) 585-8645 Today for a Free FHA/HUD 223(f) Multifamily Loan Quote

Overview of Terms, Qualifications, and Valuable Facts

Facts To Consider

HUD provides a full checklist of requirements; however, much of the checklist and process is managed in house. You can see the full HUD 223(f) checklist here. We've also provided a fairly complete synopsis of the FHA 223(f)-insured loan program below. You can find the basics to submit a file for consideration on the Apply Page of our site. 

  • 35 years fixed and fully amortizing interest rates of November 2017 are ranging between 4.10% and 4.75%, which account for MIP in the rate.
  • To be eligible, the property must be at least three years old or, if it was substantially rehabilitated, the rehabilitation must have been completed at least three years ago. Standard repairs are allowed. 
  • Monthly funding of replacement reserves is required with initial funding of replacement reserves—sometimes as much as $1,000 per unit for older properties. 
  • An annual audit of operations is required.
  • The minimum loan amount is $2 million, with exceptions made on a case-by-case basis.

ELIGIBLE PROPERTIES 

The purchase or refinancing of detached, semidetached, row, walkup, and elevator-type multifamily properties, including market-rate, low-to-moderate income, and subsidized multifamily, cooperative housing and affordable housing properties with at least five units. 

Commercial Space Limitation

Commercial and retail space is limited to the lesser of 20% of the net rentable area or 20% of the effective gross income. 

ELIGIBLE BORROWERS

Single-asset, bankruptcy-remote, for-profit or nonprofit entities.

LOAN AMOUNT/LEVERAGE/DSCR

The loan amount will be maximum proceeds subject to the lesser of:

  • 83.3% LTV or the amount of debt that can be serviced by 83.3% of net operating income for Market Rate Properties
  • 85% LTV or the amount of debt that can be serviced by 87% of net operating income for Affordable Housing Properties
  • 87% LTV or the amount of debt that can be serviced by 90% of net operating income or more for Rental Assistance Properties
  • For refinancing: the greater of 80% LTV or 100% of the total cost of refinancing the existing indebtedness and other mortgageable transaction costs 
  • For purchases: 100% of mortgageable transaction costs, excluding the portion of grants, public loans, and tax credits applied
  • Statutory per-unit limits applied 

Occupancy

Properties must have an average actual occupancy of at least 85% for the six months prior to application, and this must be maintained throughout the process until funding. The maximum underwritten occupancy for market rate properties is 93%; for affordable properties and rental assistance properties, it's 95%. 

ESCROWS

  • The replacement reserves required in accordance with HUD guidelines (minimum of $250 per unit per year) will be established by a PCNA report. An initial deposit will be required at closing, which can be funded by the mortgage proceeds. 
  • Taxes and insurance are escrowed monthly.

Repairs and Improvements

Repairs, deferred maintenance, and capital improvements for up to the greater of 15% of the property value, $6,500 per unit (adjusted for high-cost areas), or 20% of the mortgage proceeds can be included in the loan amount, subject to leverage and DSCR limitations. 

MORTGAGE INSURANCE PREMIUM 

The mortgage insurance premium is paid annually. In the above example of a rate between 4.10% and 4.75%, those interest rates already include the estimated HUD-required MIP. At origination, 1% of the loan amount is due to HUD at closing from loan proceeds as the first-year MIP. It's 0.60% annually thereafter, with an adjustment to 0.45% for affordable properties.

TERM & AMORTIZATION

Fixed and fully amortizing for up to 35 years; not to exceed 75% of the remaining economic life of the property. 

INTEREST RATE

Interest rates are fixed throughout the life of the loan and determined by prevailing market conditions. As of November 2017, interest rates on HUD 223(f)-insured loans are generally ranging from 3.10% to 4.10% before accounting for the required MIP adjustment. 

RECOURSE

All loans are non-recourse to key principals, subject to standard carve-outs.

ASSUMABILITY

All loans are fully assumable subject to FHA approval and a fee of 0.05% of the original FHA loan amount. 

PREPAYMENT

Generally, for best pricing, it's 10 years of call protection structured as a two-year lockout, followed by a step down from 8%. There's no prepayment penalty if the loan is assumed. 

SYNOPSIS OF COSTS

  • Application fee: generally $25,000 to cover third-party reports and due diligence, including:
    • Appraisal
    • Phase 1 environmental
    • PCNA 
    • Market study
  • FHA application fee: 0.30% of the loan amount
  • FHA inspection fee: 
    • $30 per unit where the repairs are more than $100,000 in total but $3,000 or less per unit
    • The greater of $30 per unit or 1% of the cost of repairs if the repairs required are greater than $3,000 per unit 
  • Finance and permanent placement fees: typically capped at 3.50% of the loan amount, paid from mortgage proceeds
  • Good-faith deposit (rate lock and commitment): 1% of the loan amount, paid at the time of commitment and refunded at closing 
  • Lender's legal, title, and other standard borrower closing costs

TIMING

FHA 223(f)-insured loans generally take 100–150 days to close, subject to deal specifics.


ADDITIONAL HUD REQUIREMENTS AND ITEMS FOR CONSIDERATIOn

  • Loans over $50 million may be subject to more conservative leverage and DSRC constraints.
  • FHA 223(f) can be used in conjunction with LIHTC.
  • FHA 223(f) can be used to refinance or acquire properties that involve Section 202, Section 236, and Section 8 funding. 
  • A Project Capital Needs Assessment (PCNA) will be required every 10 years.
  • Davis-Bacon requirements do not apply to repairs.

Get Qualified!

To apply for a 223(f)-insured loan, please go to our Apply Page and follow the instructions, or send an email with your contact information and info about your project to hello@multifamily.loans today. 

If a HUD 223(f) loan isn't right for your multifamily development or substantial rehabilitation project, please visit www.multifamily.loans for more options that include bank financing, life company financing, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and more. You may also email Multifamily.Loans directly at hello@multifamily.loans

Call Now: (877) 585-8645

Speak with a HUD-Insured Multifamily & Health Care Finance Specialist

HUD 223(a)(7)
The Fast, Affordable & Easy FHA Multifamily Loan

The FHA 223(a)(7) loan is exclusively for the refinancing of existing HUD debt on multifamily and health care properties to reduce the interest rate, increase the amortization, and subsequently improve property cash flow while reducing the cost of debt service to ultimately, in the eyes of HUD, reduce the chance of default. Incredibly, the new loan can even absorb the costs of a prepayment penalty, meaning that you don't have to wait 10 years to refinance if there is substantial downward pressure on treasury yields (as there has been over the last several years).

Further to the streamlined and affordable nature of the product—with fewer hoops than a residential mortgage on a single family home—there is no appraisal, market study, or environmental report required. The only new third-party report required is a project capital needs assessment (PCNA).

The notable out-of-pocket cost? The HUD application fee, which is 0.3% of the loan amount due at application, and of which half is refundable after closing. 223(a)(7) loans typically close about 60 days from application. This really is the fastest, easiest, and most affordable multifamily loan that one can get, but it exists only for that exclusive club whose members have existing loans like the 223(f), 221(d)(4), and other FHA-insured multifamily and health care loans. 

HUD 223(a)(7) Highlights

Eligible Properties

Multifamily and health care properties with existing HUD-insured debt. 

Maximum Loan Amount

No cash out is permitted. Loans are limited to 100% of the eligible transaction costs, including the principal amount of existing debt, prepayment penalties, repairs, fees, third-party reports, and initial reserves deposit. The loan is subject to a maximum DSCR of x1.11 for for-profit entities and x1.05 for nonprofit entities. Expenses are underwritten based on the last three years of actual operating data and FHA field office estimates. 

TERM & AMORTIZATION

The term of the loan may be extended by up to 12 years, subject to not exceeding the initial loan term (40 years in the case of 221(d)(4) and 35 years in the case of 223(f)). 

RECOURSE

All loans are non-recourse to key principals both during construction and permanent financing, subject to standard carve-outs.

ASSUMABILITY

All loans are fully assumable subject to FHA approval and a fee of 0.05% of the original FHA-insured loan amount. 

PREPAYMENT

Generally, for best pricing, 10 years of call protection with a two-year lockout, followed by a step down from 8%. There is no prepayment penalty if the loan is assumed. 

Timing

HUD 223(a)(7) loans typically close 60 days from application. 

Third-Party Reports

Third-party reports are limited to a project capital needs assessment (PCNA), which is further required every 10 years. 

Fees

HUD charges an application fee equal to 0.30% of the loan amount due at the time of application, half of which is refunded after closing. The balance of fees and costs are typically capped at 2.0%. 

 

Start Your 223(a)(7) Loan Today

Call Now: (877) 585-8645

Speak with a HUD-Insured Multifamily & Health Care Finance Specialist

HUD 241(a): Supplemental Financing For HUD-Insured Mortgages

A HUD 241(a) loan offers additional financial assistance to property owners who want to enhance their multifamily properties by making significant improvements. Acceptable (FHA 241(a)) improvements could include the addition of energy-efficient infrastructure or necessary safety equipment. HUD 241(a) loans may also be used to purchase additional land or to finance the hard and soft construction expenses necessary to expand the footprint of an existing structure.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) notes that in 2015, six projects received funding under this program. The resulting loans, totaling $25 million, resulted in the updating or construction of 974 units.



Overview of Terms, Qualification, and Valuable Facts

Potential borrowers should completely review HUD's complete checklist of requirements before beginning the application process. However, borrowers should be aware that the following restrictions could affect their chances for funding approval for a HUD 241(a) loan:

  • The project owner must provide at least 10 percent of the total cost of the loan.
  • This program is used to keep existing multifamily units competitive in the current market, while not exceeding the property's appraised value.

Our Apply Page provides a way to apply for funding through the program.

Eligible Properties

Multifamily properties that already hold HUD-insured or HUD-held loans are eligible.

Eligible Borrowers

People who own a FHA-insured or HUD-held multifamily property may qualify for a HUD 241(a) loan.

Loan Amount/DSCR

The maximum loan amount will be the lesser of:

  • Up to 90 percent of the value of a new construction project for for-profit entities and 95 percent for nonprofit entities
  • An amount that will not surpass the insurable amount of the project as specified by HUD
  • Up to 90 percent of the net operating income, which should include the first mortgage debt payment obligation

Borrowers should expect a DSCR of at least 1.11x.

Occupancy

Requirements should not exceed the existing terms of the underlying mortgage.

Escrows

Escrow is determined by previous mortgage restrictions.

Mortgage Insurance Premium

Borrowers should expect to pay an annual mortgage insurance premium of 0.95 percent of the principal loan amount. Certain projects may qualify for a reduced mortgage insurance premium, which could range from 0.25-0.35 percent if the project meets additional environmental or affordability restrictions.

Term and Amortization

The length of the HUD 241(a) must match the same term as the first mortgage. However, if less than 25 years remain on the mortgage term, the term can extend up to 40 years. An extended mortgage term cannot exceed 75 percent of the remaining useful life of the improvements.

Interest Rate

Borrowers can expect a fixed interest rate reflective of the current market rate at closing.

Recourse

Like all FHA multifamily loans, the HUD 241(a) is a non-recourse product.

Assumability

Loans are assumable provided the borrower meets FHA approval.

Prepayment

Terms can vary. A five-year lockout with a 5 percent penalty in the sixth year or a two-year lockout with an 8 percent penalty in the third year are two common terms. Borrowers can expect a comparable combination of penalties and lockouts for the first 10 years of the loan.

Synopsis of Costs

Cost of third party reports vary by market. Borrowers may need:

  • Environmental studies (Phase I Environmental Reports commonly required if the building is expanded or significant building improvements are suggested.)
  • Market studies
  • Full appraisal reports
  • Architectural and engineering reports
  • Seismic reports
  • FHA Application Fee: 0.30 percent of the loan amount
  • FHA Inspection Fee: 0.5 percent of the loan amount
  • Finance and Permanent Placement Fees: up to 3.5 percent of the loan amount due at closing
  • The lender may charge a reasonable fee to offset title, legal and other closing costs.

Timing

HUD-241(a)-insured loans can close within 20 weeks. This timeline allows for eight weeks for the pre-application process and eight weeks for the firm application process. Borrowers should expect to wait another three to four weeks for closing. If the loan will fund a new construction project or substantial rehabilitation, borrowers can opt for single-stage processing to decrease the overall application period.


Additional HUD Requirements and Items for Consideration

  • HUD 241(a) loans are subject to the same restrictions and regulations that govern the root mortgage loan insurance program.
  • Borrowers must meet the same IOD requirements and working capital requirements that govern the 221(d)(4) program, unless they obtain waivers.
  • David Bacon wage requirements apply to contractors working on the project.
  • Borrowers should expect to schedule a pre-application conference with the local HUD Program Center or Multifamily HUB to verify the feasibility of the proposed multifamily property improvements.

Get Qualified!

To begin the HUD 241(a) application process, email us your contact and project information to hello@multifamily.loans today. Borrowers can also apply for an FHA insured multifamily loan online and follow the listed instructions to start an application.

The HUD 241(a) loan doesn't meet the unique needs of every multifamily property owner. To learn about other financial options to update or expand and improve your apartment building portfolio, email us directly at hello@multifamily.loans. Potential borrowers can also visit www.multifamily.loans for additional options that may include Fannie Mae Apartment Loans, Freddie Mac Small Balance Loans, bank financing and life company financing for multifamily properties.

Call Now: (877) 585-8645

Speak With a HUD Insured Multifamily & Healthcare Finance Specialist

HUD 232/223(f) Healthcare - Purchase Financing & Refinancing

HUD/ FHA 232/223(f) is a federal loan program to finance or refinance the development of residential care facilities. Investors and developers may qualify for this FHA insured funding for the purchase, construction, rehabilitation or refinance of facilities such as nursing homes, board and care properties, and assisted living centers. HUD 232 is s by the Office of Residential Care Facilities under the purview of the Federal Housing Administration.

HUD loans are backed by the federal government and available through FHA-approved lenders. For commercial developers, a HUD loan may offer favorable terms that provide financial stability during the planning and construction process. FHA 232/223(f) insured financing is a sound option for developers who want to expand their presence in their residential care industry or upgrade the quality of their existing facilities with long term, fixed-rate, non-recourse senior debt.



Facts to Consider

FHA 232 loans may be used to refinance or purchase existing properties, to renovate existing facilities, or a combination of these purposes. For example, HUD funding for a new purchase of a board and care facility and rehabilitation of a nursing home is acceptable.

HUD 232 is a loan product for borrowers who seek new financing. Those with existing FHA funding can access the streamlined refinancing process through HUD 223(a)(7). This option helps borrowers to reduce interest rates and increase cash flow through to existing projects.

There are strict guidelines about qualifying properties for FHA's 232/223(f). Developers must show the facilities meet licensing standards and fulfill the right purposes. Specifically, there is a cap in the percentage of independent living units allowed in qualifying buildings. Facilities must not be new, and borrowers must meet strict conditions.

Eligible Properties

HUD's FHA 232/223(f) loans are for healthcare properties, specifically skilled nursing care facilities. Eligible properties must be already established and not new construction projects in the planning stages. Specifically, HUD requirements include:

  • Skilled nursing or assisted living facilities
  • Must be licensed and regulated by municipality or state authority
  • Properties offering care for people who need long-term care or medical attention
  • Complete for at least three years
  • Recent additions less than three years old are acceptable as long as the addition is not larger than the original facility
  • Commercial space is not to exceed 20 percent of floor area or income
  • Independent living units cannot comprise more than 25 percent of use
  • Must accommodate 20 or more patients who require continuous or skilled nursing care

Properties with entrance fees are ineligible, as are hospitals, clinics, halfway houses and similar facilities. Similarly properties that do not provide continuous care, such as retirement homes, boarding houses or other facilities that only provide room and board are ineligible.

Eligible Borrowers

  • For-profit, nonprofit and public borrowers are eligible. These may include investors, developers, builders and nonprofit entities.
  • FHA & HUD requires borrowers to be experienced owner-operators of similar facilities. Credit and financial capacity requirements must also be met.

Use of Proceeds

In addition to strict guidelines on loan borrowers and eligible properties, HUD imposes limitations on how funds are to be utilized. Specifically, HUD allows for the financing of reserve funds for replacement over a 15-year period, but those rehabilitation costs cannot exceed 15 percent of the project's overall value once repairs are complete.

Loan Amount/Leverage/DSCR

The maximum loan amount depends on the nature of the borrower, as the FHA sets different rates depending on whether the debtor is for-profit or nonprofit.

For purchase transactions:

  • Lesser of 85 percent of the acquisition price or appraised value (for-profits)
  • Lesser of 90 percent of the acquisition price or appraised value (non-profits)

For refinance transactions:

  • Lesser of 100 percent of the cost to refinance or 85 percent of appraised value (for-profits)
  • Lesser of 100 percent of the cost to refinance or 90 percent of appraised value (non-profits)

Although these are the maximum amounts, the HUD/FHA application process may require greater credit scrutiny if larger amounts are requested.

The Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) must be greater than or equal to 1.45x.

Synopsis of Costs

  • The costs associated with a HUD 232/223(f) loan are dependent on specific loan circumstances. In general, borrowers are responsible for:
  • Non-refundable HUD Application fee: $3 per $1,000 (0.3 percent) of the loan amount.
  • FHA inspection fee: 0.50 percent paid from loan proceeds.
  • Lender application fees applied to due diligence activities and third-party reports, including credit reports, appraisal, plans and specs review, and market study.
  • Good faith deposit (rate lock and commitment): Between 0.50 percent and 1 percent of loan amount paid at time of commitment and refunded at closing.
  • Initial replacement reserves.
  • Standard borrower closing costs.

Escrows

Tax, insurance, replacement reserves and mortgage insurance premium escrows are required.

Escrows are required for taxes, property insurance and depreciable item replacement reserve. If repairs are needed, a 120 percent refundable escrow is required, 100 percent of which is funded from loan proceeds and 20 percent of which is funded by the borrower.

Mortgage Insurance Premium

The annual Mortgage Insurance Premium (MIP) is 1 percent payable at closing. The MIP is 0.65 percent annually thereafter.

Term & Amortization

Loans must last a minimum of 10 years. The maximum term on an HUD 232/223(f) loan is 35 years or 75 percent of the remaining life of the facility, fully amortizing.

Interest Rate

HUD's FHA 232/223(f) loans are at a fixed interest rate, subject to market conditions. Your HUD lender can provide more information about interest rates if you explore the option of applying for an HUD 232/223(f) loan.

Recourse

HUD loans are non-recourse to principals with standard carve-outs.

Assumability

The loan is assumable with FHA/HUD approval. The assumability fee is 0.05 percent, payable to HUD.

Prepayment

Prepayment is generally an option with approved HUD's FHA 232/223(f) insured mortgages. The federal authority normally imposes a two-year lock-out where prepayment is not an option and a penalty that declines as the loan ages.

Application

FHA 232/223(f) are subject to the LEAN application process. This streamlined procedure eliminates paperwork reduplication and implements a checklist for lenders and borrowers to follow in order to promote efficiency within the application process. It generally progresses in five steps:

Step One: Submission of application.

Step Two: Preliminary underwriting.

Step Three: Initiate third-party verification and due diligence measures.

Step Four: Receipt of HUD firm commitment letter.

Seven Five: Finalization of loan documentation and closing.

Refinanced Properties

Any current mortgages or other loans incurred on the property within two years of application must meet specific program eligibility guidelines and may have a seasoning requirements. In addition, equity take-out loans may be eligible for immediate refinancing, depending on the loan amount and HUD-insured loan-to-value ratio.

Timing

LEAN transactions for HUD's FHA 232/223(f) loans typically take four to six months from application to closing. The actual time frame varies depending on the complexity of the application and the receipt of applicant information.

Post-Closing Reporting

FHA 232/223(f) loans require the owner of the property to submit audited financial statements each year within 90 days of the close of the fiscal year. These statements must be prepared in accordance with 24 CFR 5.801 and 200.36 guidelines. Additionally, the operators of the property must submit quarterly financial statements.


Get Qualified!

To apply for a HUD 232/223(f) loan please go to our Apply Page, or send an email with your contact information and details about your project to hello@multifamily.loans today.

If a HUD 232/223(f) loan isn't right for your residential care facility project, please visit www.multifamily.loans for more options that include bank financing, life company financing, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and more. You may e-mail Multifamily.loans directly at hello@multifamily.loans.

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